Monthly Archives: July 2006

Current TV – Seeds of Tolerance project and prize

wish I had spotted this sooner..but for any of you (residents of the US only) who have the time in the next two weeks and want to make a short video about tolerance , why not win $100,000 and give $15,000 to a charity of your choice.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under mentors, non profits

Nata Village Blog

Pledger Curt Hopkins alerted me recently to the Nata Village Blog, and put Jon Rawlinson in touch with us at MW.

Jon and I finally met this week and he told me how his travels in Africa, videoblogging along the way have changed his life.

Stopping off in a remote village in Botswana he chanced across a US peace corps worker who had set up home in Nata Village. With his travelling companian he chucked in his plans for a comfortable night at the lodge to visit the village and stay closer to the ground. The visit and people he met changed a lot and Jon has since set up a blog for the Nata Village project and Melody Jenkins’ many projects educating locals about HIV and setting up a clinic there.

Currently in London, Jon is looking for ways of using his considerable video shooting and editing skills to contribute more. Have immediately snapped him up as a mentor. But what did hearten me was to find that he has scoured this blog and has now been in touch with Kiva.org (see previous post) and it’s CEO Matt Flannery , and will be visiting them in San Francisco mid August to offer his help.

You can read about the two Microsoft Fellow’s findings (see previous blog post) here, or on Matt’s blog.

Without describing our whole conversation – all my old documentary making tendencies came pouring out as we discussed the power of narrative and the kind of storytelling video is good at. He is off too to meet Current TV who if they have any sense, will snap him up. Hmmm, got me thinking. Given they pay $500 per video used maybe I should take it up again to fund Mentoring Worldwide!

Glad our blog is working. Come September, following a real holiday, I hope others will want to start co-blogging here, and we work together to get our trial/ proof of conept up and running for real.

Leave a comment

Filed under Africa, communities, mentees, mentors, microfinance, non profits, pledger

Mentoring Worldwide in Business Week

Bruno Giussani came to London and had lunch with me a few months ago now. He didn’t take notes. This great article was published last week on his blog and in Business Week. Now I know why his blog is called Lunch Over IP. You take him to lunch , he gets the IP! No, seriously….I can see why he won a prize. It’s well written, illuminating, and truly European.

It made me think though. Time is passing. It’s six months this weekend since the pledge was successfully closed on January 15th. I am writing a six month report for myself and for the two people who have funded some of my activities to date (and for any of the pledgers who might want it!). My thanks as ever to Chris Anderson and Jan Leeman.

I’m trying to use the blog to tell the story of the project as well as linking to people and ideas we are in touch with during the research.

But there are some next steps to announce! We are going to run a trial. I will be fundraising for a project manager to join me for six months or so. You can do a lot on top of a full time job, BUT we want to move on and we need someone excellent on the case full time for the next phase. Watch this space and the mailing list for details.

Leave a comment

Filed under Set-up, Story, trial

serendipity – Kiva and Life in Africa

Friday June 2nd (apologies, blog is so out of synch). I am preparing to meet Fiona Ramsay of Kiva in San Francisco. Researching the organisation I find , on their front page no less, a description of Life In Africa…the project run by Christina Jordan …one of our pledgers! Something is definately going right. Christina is a pledger active in the Omidyar Network (and we have quite a few people from the Omidyar Network community who did pledge). She is also an Ashoka Fellow living in Uganda.

Fiona desicribes the groundbreaking work that Kiva is doing. Barely a year old they are winning plaudits, and pioneering an effective peer-to-peer microfinance organisation which as Fiona diplomatically puts it is “deceptively complex”. I leave inspired and with a new sense of how mentoring could make a difference. Perhaps not directly with entrepreneurs on the ground, but with the newer and smaller Micro Finance Institutions who report on the projects, write journals and suggest the entrepreneurs to Kiva. They have a great model and we will talk again. If you are interested in Microfinance I strongly encourage to take a look at their work and get involved.They have two interns blogging from Africa at present, and their founder, Matthew Flannery blogs at Social Edge.

Back in London I book a call with Christina. Life In Africa has potentially six mentees for us. I hear about the project, but also am immensly encouraged to ask for help. The time is coming and we’ll soon have a framework that people can volunteer into. I listen too , this time in the Omidyar Network, to her amazing efforts to work with the best of internet and computer providers in the area (Kampala and Gulu) BushNet and Inveneo and realise that while the solutions may be out there, getting people on the ground to join up the dots is still unbelievably hard, and patience, courage and perseverence are the name of the game. She has two Microsoft Fellows visiting to learn about the project and the difficulties and needs in the area of connectivity. Sounds fascinating.

It somehow did not seem so suprising when I called Fiona today a month after the conversation with Christina to find the same Microsoft Fellows about to report their findings to Kiva, tomorrow.

4 Comments

Filed under Africa, mentees, microfinance, non profits, pledger, trial

green tea in palo alto

Leaving Cisco and Netsquared behind, back on the Light Rail and Cal Train to Palo Alto where I met with pledgers and supporters John Girard of Clickability and Jan Leeman.

They listened hard and got their impressive brains working on who I should meet in my remaining two days. They suggested three companies and got me meetings, or phone meetings with all of them there and then!

Microfinance is an area many people have suggested might be fruitful in terms of finding mentees and I was put in touch with a new and very impressive company, Kiva. to start talking about the realities of this suggestion.

My quest to find a good user-centred design approach to our cross-cultural needs, the desire to keep things simple to use, and simple to manage led to a call to brand new start-up Ruby Red Labs.

And third Taproot, an organisation that matches volunteers with non-profits who need volunteers to help them with their capacity building.

More about all of these organisations in due course. In the meantime though – check out this elegant tea bag. green tea( hesitate to call it bag really made, as it was , from the finest muslin)!

1 Comment

Filed under design, microfinance, non profits, pledger, social enterprise

social enterprise (netsquared contd)

Lee Davis from NESst summed things up nicely for me in the session on new web tools and their revenue models when he talked about the need to match the values of the work you want to do with the business model chosen. “social enterprise is the current term for this kind of funding and area” he said. He highlighted the need for creativity in thinking about how to do this and extolled the benefits of the MFA over the MBA when it came to the field of social entrepreneurship.

With this the link was made at the conference bewteen non-profits , charities, and social entrepreneurs, a link which had been missing up until that point. Jim Fruchterman suggested that “Mission-based fundraising” was really the subject of this panel, and how to make the customers of your mission-based business your fundraisers. He felt the sector (non-profit) was years behind the times in terms of technology.

“People need to feel personally connected and get an emotional return” argued Clara Miller, CEO of the Nonprofit Finance Fund.

Lots of useful links in this session. Global Giving. Desribed by Wikipedia thus

GlobalGiving is an online marketplace that directly connects donors with grassroots projects in the developing world. Its mission is to become the world’s richest marketplace in international aid and philanthropy – rich not only in terms of funding, but also in terms of knowledge and innovation. Its long-term goal is to globalize opportunity

VolunteerMatch. Does what it says on the tin!

Benetech, founded by speaker Jim Fruchterman, supported by the Skoll Foundation and the Omidyar Network and winner of the Skoll Award for Social
Entrepreneurship

NESst

NESsT’s mission is to find lasting solutions to systemic poverty and social injustice through the development of social enterprises — mission-driven businesses that increase the financial sustainability and social change impact of civil society organizations.

NESsT achieves its mission by combining the tools and strategies of business entrepreneurship with the mission and values of nonprofit entrepreneurship to support the development of social enterprises in emerging democracies worldwide

Surdna Foundation ..read its history here. Non profit sector support.

Non Profit Finance Fund

One of the big question for us is what kind of social enterprise are we? As I am clear that is what we are.

.

Leave a comment

Filed under conferences, non profits, philanthropy, social enterprise

old media is the new new media

the netsquared session on the developing world was fascinating. It contrasted two approaches to thinking about connectivity – one in India the other in Africa.

Partha Pratim Sarka from Bytes For All talked about how the telecentre network in India was being used in creative and ingenious ways far beyond the humble telephone call. In fact they were also being used to email and to blog – by sending an email from a telecentre to a blog blogging became possible in an area of minimal connectivity. This really demonstrated (to me, at least) the underlying cultural practises of sharing, collaboration, harnessing collective intelligence and peer to peer communication in a world where technology is not owned, but shared. There are 600,000 telecentres around India and the Mission 2007 is to develop a training commons for grassroots connectivity and learning.

David Barnard of Sangonet presented a very different picture. While he mentioned that of a population of 850 million people in Africa 85 million had moble phones (1 in 10!) , he concentrated on the benefits of broadband and suggested no progress would be made until Africa was all internet connected. At only 2.6% internet penetration this suggests a way to go. While he pointed to various examples of innovation in connectivity he concentrated on the necessity of deregulation. It’s true the cost of telecoms in Sub Saharan Africa is way too high – I think he is missing some signs of innovation and hope in the mobile phone area. After all it is quite possible the fixed line will not be a necessary staging post.

For me the interest was in the contrast of the presentations. One very bottom up, one pretty top down. It is true the intrastructure in India is considered to be better. Partha told us that there is a complete fibre optic network connecting the train stations of India. People took a long time to realise that could be used for other things, but they did!

At some point the immoderator asked “what can web 2.0 do the for the developing world?” It seemed to me it was the wrong question. More interesting to think about what can the developing world do for web 2.0? Invent, invent invent!

Leave a comment

Filed under Africa, conferences, India, Story